The Teacher Who Couldn’t Read

It’s hard to imagine that a school board would every hire a teacher who couldn’t read. Well, if I have been given a reading test past the grade 4 level, I may not have been hired.

I am a teacher with 18 years experience. I am qualified in many areas including Reading, Technology, Math, and Special Education. I have 5 university degrees. But I cannot read well aloud past the grade 4 level, really.

I went through school with an undiagnosed reading disability called Dyslexia. When I read, words and letters move. I have a great difficulty writing and especially when I need to proofread my work. As a student, I was told I was slow … I failed grade one. I was told I made careless mistakes and I was sloppy. Spelling tests were a nightmare for me. Luckily, through lots of hard work and determination and using computers to support me in my work … I am here writing to you today as a teacher.

I’ve written a book about my challenges as a student to help students, teachers, and parents become informed of the challenges faced by struggling readers.

Here’s the link to a PDF download … share it with your students, their parents, and your colleagues.

Remember, everyday students come to school to do their best learning.

Collaboratively Yours,

Deb Weston

The Girl Who Couldn't Read

https://wp.me/P9ueH0-P

 

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Updated: January 28, 2018 — 5:04 pm

The Author

Deborah Weston

I love teaching and have been practicing for over 18 years in the Peel DSB. I have taught grades 2 through to grade 8, including split and contained Spec Ed classes. I am an advocate for issues on Workplace Health & Safety, Special Education, Mental Wellness, LGBTQT, and FNMI. I believe that when working collaboratively, teachers are better together. In 2015, I earned my PhD in Education Policy and Leadership with a focus on teacher collaboration and policy implementation. Follow me on Twitter @dr_weston_PhD

2 Comments

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  1. Fletcher Jerome says:

    Thank you for this. I too have a learning disability associated with reading. My brain will substitute similar words. My former law school associate dean told me, “any consideration given to you ended at the door” and this put a freeze on me advocating for myself. As you can guess I did not successfully complete law school. Instead, a couple years later I enrolled in teacher training at OISE. My profs recognized my challenges and after I mentioned my struggles they sent me to student services for tests.

    I am hoping to return to law school and complete my legal training.

    cheers,

    Fletcher

    1. Deborah Weston says:

      Love your comments. I did not get any accommodations either … that might have given me an “advantage” over other students. Despite my disadvantages, I discovered my dyslexia super powers! Don’t give up on your goals. You are entitled to accommodations. Download my book. I’m publishing it for distribution to Chapters etc.

      Keep me updated to your success.

      Deb Weston, PhD

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